The Major Causes And Types Of Frame Rate Drops In Games

Written by Tomas Bydzovsky on Sat, Nov 14, 2015 4:00 PM

If you are gamer, then you must have definitely seen visual lags in games. You're probably familiar with terms like latency, framerate, frame times, frames per second, as well as how to measure and benchmark them and what they mean. If not, or you just want to know what makes these things tick, then this article is for you.

There are three main causes of frame rate drops and disruptions when playing games:

1) framerate variability drops

2) stuttering

3) micro-stuttering

Let's start with reminding ourselves of some of the basic terminology first:

Frame Latency - The time which the GPU needs to render a frame into the frame buffer, measured in miliseconds (ms). More complex scenes needs more time.

Frame Time (= Frame Interval) - The time between displaying two subsequent frames, measured in miliseconds (ms).

Frame Rate - The frequency/rate of frames produced by the GPU, measured in frames per second (fps). If a GPU is outputting at 30 frames per second, a frame is being generated every 33.3ms (1000/30).

Refresh Rate - Refresh rate is the frequency of frames displayed by monitor, measured in hertz (Hz). A monitor outputs at this refresh rate regardless of gaming performance. 

You might say the difference between these terms is unimportant, but let's take a look at an example:

Say you play a game with V-Sync enabled on a 60Hz monitor. The GPU renders a frame in 9ms, but then the buffer stores it for another 7.67ms to match the refresh rate of  theV-Sync (60Hz = 16.67ms per frame).

Graphics Processing Unit (= GPU) - The component which renders images into a frame buffer (and sends those via output to the monitor screen).

Central Processing Unit (= CPU)- The component which does operations given by software; usually all sorts of arithmetic, logical, control and input/output tasks

So what's the trick? Well, most graphics cards reviews are comparing average fps, but don't take into account the fluidity of the frame rate. And so it may easily happen that a graphics card which scored lower in average fps comparisons, may actually provide more enjoyable and smoother results during gameplay.

Framerate Variability Drops

In most benchmarks we can clearly see the framerate isn't constant. This is caused by "heavy" scenes (usually fights, crowded places etc) where the GPU needs to render significantly more polygons and textures. Usually the framerate changes shouldn't be too drastic, but if they are then it's called a frame drop. In general we can say that the bigger the drop between the average and the dip, the more difficult the game is to play.

Stuttering

Unlike framerate variability, stuttering is sudden or immediate framerate change, caused by poor level design optimization or insufficient processing resources required for scene rendering . The culprit isn't always the GPU, but often also the CPU which doesn't pass the rendering "orders" to the GPU. In general we can say that the more often the stuttering, the more difficult a the game is to play.

An easy way to think of it is like a flip picture book. If you flick the pages at a steady rate you get a smooth image, but if you were to get stuck on a few pages the illusion would be lost and it would become difficult to read.

Micro-Stuttering

Micro-stuttering is a special type of stuttering, which happens often with multi-GPU solutions, such as SLI or CrossFire. The cause is cyclical short and long frame times because of frame timing problems between the two graphics cards. In standard multi-GPU setups the individual graphics cards alternate rendering each frame. This theoretically doubles performance, but there can be issues pacing the frames as GPUs try to send images to the display as quickly as possible, rather than following a cadence. 

 To prevent such issues, GPU manufacturers provide algorithms such as Frame Pacing (AMD) or Frame Metering (nVidia) which provide the correct frame timings for each card. In practice what it does is hold back a frame until the delayed frame is ready, which keeps a regular cadence.  

Unfortunately AMD and Nvidia's efforts aren't perfect, and there's always going to minor instances of micro-stuttering when using multi-GPU setups. If you want consistent frame pacing then a single GPU is the way to go, but you are then sacrificing brute force performance. 

What do you think about such issues? Do you often experience those? Is a stable frame rate important to you rather than higher framerate with spikes? Let us know your opinion in the comments below!

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14:45 Nov-21-2015

I'd rather have a smooth frame rate than a high frame rate.

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15:59 Nov-21-2015

yup, that's why console games and their ports have usually 30fps caps :)

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04:31 Nov-18-2015

frame rates are also drop by 5-10 using frap recording

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13:44 Nov-16-2015

Excellent information. Thank you for this article!

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14:23 Nov-16-2015

you're welcome, thanks for reading :)

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08:27 Nov-16-2015

Well I undeestand it all, except this micro stutter. Could someone please tell me what this means. I most probably came across it, but didnt notice it. Thanks!

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23:04 Nov-15-2015

Excellent article!
Really really well done!
"Well, most graphics cards reviews are comparing average fps, but don't take into account the fluidity of the frame rate. And so it may easily happen that a graphics card which scored lower in average fps comparisons, may actually provide more enjoyable and smoother results during gameplay."


This is very important. I hope everyone understood its importance. :D

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15:07 Nov-15-2015

micro stuttering is really annoying when it happens

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18:49 Nov-15-2015

that's one of reasons I went for one 980Ti instead of two 970's in SLI :)

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21:31 Nov-15-2015

I would have gone for SLI 980Ti anyway. That 4K DSR at Ultra is just too good to pass down.

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08:42 Nov-16-2015

I'll rather get 32-channel optical audio card if I decide to fill another 2 PCIex slots :D

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17:13 Nov-16-2015

to each his own xD

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11:42 Nov-15-2015

hey man very nice informative article for new gamers keep up

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18:48 Nov-15-2015

thanks, stay tuned for more ;))

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09:18 Nov-15-2015

For me giant stutter was having 4gb ram, it's gone since i upgraded to 8gb.

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09:58 Nov-15-2015

have higher end rig and maybe youll know what the article is referring too

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18:48 Nov-15-2015

yup 8GB ram is what all gamers should have nowadays :D

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04:34 Nov-15-2015

Thank you for this article man...really useful

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18:47 Nov-15-2015

you're welcome, glad you find it useful :)

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03:28 Nov-15-2015

keep this article always on top, please....

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18:47 Nov-15-2015

I have couple more in my sleeves ;))

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03:23 Nov-15-2015

Main reason I personally have drops and stutters it's because of my very old hard drives trying to load in textures and other resources. A couple of SSD's are on the top of my wishlist ^^

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18:46 Nov-15-2015

from my personal experience, I can honestly say SSD doesn't make that much when you put games on it (primarily because developers don't expect people to install games on SSDs yet) - I have Witcher III on my 500GB SSD, brother has it on 2TB HDD (he has 250GB for OS) and load times differences are practically negligible :)

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21:33 Nov-15-2015

Depends on the game, really. Some games load very fast now since I've switched from HDD to SSD. I bet it's more to do with what and how files need to be processed when being loaded into RAM/VRAM, in which case the CPU could be the bottleneck.

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21:38 Nov-15-2015

The difference is not like night and day tho is it? I mean, instead of 5 seconds it can load it in 3 that sort of thing...

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22:00 Nov-15-2015

I haven't benched games in particular since I play different games at different points in time. But what I CAN say is night and day are:
Windows loading times, file reading/writing times, software loading times, caching times, etc. And by 'night and day' I really do mean 'night and day'.
The best for me is file transfer, since I move a LOT of them (I'm a photographer). SSD + USB3 (on all ends) = FTW

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18:20 Nov-16-2015

Well, I have an SSHD Hybrid drive so I do get most of the same speed advantages as I would with a full fledged SSD like boot times and load times for applications. My Hybrid has 8GB which is a lot when you really think about, it as it only has to store parts of information to give me fast load times...

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20:19 Nov-16-2015

well, if you copied a lot of data then it would go back to the HDD speeds. Imagine me or my assistant having to offload a 64GB card after half a day's photoshoot. Love it that I can do that at nearly 200MB/s with the new cards on the SurfacePro3, for example!

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05:02 Nov-16-2015

I have found recently that i kept hearing my steam hd spin up a lot during FO4 and I'd watch my in-game fps counter drop each time. I switched to a SSD and stopped having those issues. Those were easily the only frame drops i would get since I use CCC to limit the game to 60fps.

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03:17 Nov-15-2015

I missed the old days wherein having 2GB VRAM 128/256 bit is enough to run all games at high settings. Nowadays. It's impossible for having an excellent rig to last 4 years.

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03:20 Nov-15-2015

If you play in "normal" resolutions and are not fussy about FSAA settings you can pretty much buy for 3 to 4 years pretty easy actually...

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18:44 Nov-15-2015

my 2GB (GDDR5, 256bit bus) GTX770 does pretty fine in my brother's rig at 1080p :))

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19:17 Nov-15-2015

Yup..just like my GTX760 can hold its own in todays games...

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03:07 Nov-15-2015

How about VRAM?Stutter Due to insufficient VRAM?

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04:42 Nov-15-2015

Maybe or may not be..
It depends on how well the game is optimized to use the available resources.
Maybe i'm wrong but as of my knowledge i'm saying this..
About 2-3 years ago 1 gig of VRAM is enough to play games on high setting,but duo to the next gen console nowadays game at-least require 2 gig of VRAM.

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18:43 Nov-15-2015

not enough VRAM causes serious lags, not stutters :)))
but usually it's problem of inefficient leveldesign or demanding effects at first place :)

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06:13 Nov-16-2015

People don't want high graphics and visually stunning game rather we want more optimized game,so that every one can enjoy it[every doesn't have great GPU,LIKE ME???????].
Game devs should think about it...

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01:03 Nov-15-2015

i just bought the lenovo y50 with the gtx 860 for 950 bucks and im having crashes and CPU throttling when playing with battery, anyone knows a solution for this?

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04:45 Nov-15-2015

don't play the games with battery[because that will not give you a desired performance]
So get the battery out of laptop and then play the game

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08:17 Nov-15-2015

Set the power plan to max performance and run your laptop with the AC adapter plugged in.

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12:33 Nov-15-2015

Dont run the latest drivers on it they are causing a lot of fuss

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18:41 Nov-15-2015

I can only guess power settings is set to sort of power-saving when on battery, as Alex said, use "high performance" power scheme :)

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22:01 Nov-14-2015

No mention of paging, on a ram starved system or a system that has too slow clocked ram?

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22:09 Nov-14-2015

ram has usually nothing to do with framerate drops, unless the game crashes of course :)

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23:27 Nov-14-2015

Disagree here. I have tested systems where changing RAM setup from 8 to 12 greatly reduced stuttering quite a bit. Shifting from a 5400 rpm to a 7200 rpm HDD, also reduces stuttering or even a hybrid drive at 8 gigs of RAM. This difference disappeared when I installed 12 gigs of RAM. This clearly points to a RAM starved systems using the pagefile too much and causing stuttering.

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23:39 Nov-14-2015

ah true, but RAM allocation for the game is again dependant on game engine and operating system, so RAM itself is kind of indirect troublemaker, if you understand me :)

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23:56 Nov-14-2015

Yeah definitely. It can mainly fix the stutter if you're having it but isnt very likely to cause it. One damn exception is Black Ops 3. That game is based around 16 gigs of RAM or has a massive, massive memory leak.

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06:48 Nov-15-2015

Oh yes. I remember having a nightmarish but fun experience playing San Andreas on 128 MB Ram. God, miss that god-awful moment :'-)

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23:41 Nov-14-2015

I'll have to disagree as well. I still remember how adding an aditional 512MB of RAM to form a grand total total of 1GB (old DDR SDRAM!) back in the day boosted my DooM3 performance from -30-40fps to a solid 60+. Everything became massively smooth. There's a reason games require a minimum amount of RAM to run effectively!

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20:17 Nov-14-2015

For SLI micro stutter I have found that locking the frame rate below your minimum fps or using v-sync when your lowest fps is higher than your screen's refresh rate pretty much eliminates it.


Witcher 3 is a good example. I get a 48fps average with a minimum of 40fps with everything maxed out & the game stutters a little, but if I lock the game to 30fps the stutter goes away & the game plays very smooth.

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23:44 Nov-14-2015

Another solution of mine that worked for me was boosting that refresh rate. Running at 105Hz atm helps draw more frames (everything is super smooth when running above 60 because now I can display those frames!) and if it can't - I still get the benefit of less latency. Some games do still stutter very minorly (someone unfamiliar with it wouldn't notice), but it doesn't impact my gameplay, personally.

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19:42 Nov-14-2015

Well, I went out and bought a 144Hz monitor with a 1ms response time. (See specs) I play all my games with V-sync enabled and everything is smooth and fluid now. I strongly suggest gamers do this as it really improves the gaming experience. I think of it as a cheap way to get near G-sync gameplay!

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19:46 Nov-14-2015

that monitor of yours isn't IPS, is it? :)
I believe 144fps-capable monitor indeed is a step forward, but for me since I really got used to 27" 2560x1440 IPS, I cannot consider upgrading to anything lesser than 144Hz 2560x1440 IPS :D

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19:54 Nov-14-2015

Nope TN I believe. I noticed a huge difference going from 60Hz to 144Hz 1ms. For example in BF4 with V-sync enabled the game feels and looks more fluid now. And I have noticed my frame rate is more constant now. I would say, 144Hz/1s has as big of an impact as the SSD has on the PC...

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23:47 Nov-14-2015

Running an overclocked laptop panel at 105Hz here and personally I now call a 60Hz refresh rate LAG :D I'm not running below 75Hz even at work!
It's one of the great PC feats and I'll be definitely investing in a quality 144Hz display when I build my next PC :)

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23:56 Nov-14-2015

lol yeah, ever since I switched over to 144hz I feel like I'm experiencing major lag if I get frame drops down to 60fps XD thats something I never thought I would say!

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02:20 Nov-15-2015

TZZ: When I was doing my research on LCD's I decided to go with the tried and true TN (twisted nematic) over IPS (In-Plane switching) because basically TN allows for the lowest response times over IPS. IPS has better colours at all angles but I don't think enough to over-rule lower gaming response times....looking at the response time of your monitor, you have an 8ms vs. my 1ms which is much more responsive for gaming imo. I think it would be noticeable between the two in a video game situation. Your thoughts?

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19:10 Nov-14-2015

For me I just want a constant 30 FPS, I would love 60 but since I don't have the budget for a card capable of Ultra + 1080p + 60FPS then I'm more than happy to settle for 30FPS - that's better than my current card runs most games anyway! When I get the GTX 960 I'm expecting to get around 40 FPS at Ultra on most games - however if possible I'll limit this to 30 to prevent as much variability and stuttering as possible.

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19:43 Nov-14-2015

I used to play Witcher III at locked 30fps at 2560x1440 with GTX770 myself :D
btw which software do you use for capping framerate (when it's not possible via ingame menu directly)?

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20:17 Nov-14-2015

With NVIDIA Inspector you can cap FPS in individual games:
Open it. click tools icon "[X]" search game profile or create new profile and activate [Frame Rate Limiter]

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20:36 Nov-14-2015

I either use Nvidia's adaptive (half refresh rate) found in their CP or rivatuner statistics server. Rivatuner most of the time.

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20:43 Nov-14-2015

I like adaptive v-sync when it works, but some games have issues with it. Like the newer Total War games. It causes stutter & lower frame rates on Rome 2 & Attila for some reason

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20:48 Nov-14-2015

I'm using adaptive (non half refresh rate) v-sync while playing Witcher 3... Works great. :D

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21:15 Nov-14-2015

I've tried adaptive and full V-sync and I prefer full as it seems to give me a more stable constant frame rate. My Oc'd GTX760 can't render 144 fps-144Hz in every game but like example in BF4 it can get close (around 100 to 120 FPS) n most situations. It is hard to put words to it but after upgrading my monitor from 60Hz anything fluid motion moves more realistic now...

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23:50 Nov-14-2015

Agreed. Once I OC'd my display to 105Hz it's been the single greatest achievement in gaming for me :D

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02:06 Nov-15-2015

How do you OC a laptop display actually?

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13:43 Nov-15-2015

@Maleficarus - easy in a bizarre way. First I used a Pixel Clock Patcher to patch the drivers to uncap some limitations to bandwidth sent to the display. Then I use the Custom Resolution Utility (CRU) to set the same 1080p resolution but with a higher refresh rate (the max I found I can do is 107Hz with zero artifacting). Finding out what Hz you can do is easy via EVGA Pixel Clock OC program.

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13:45 Nov-15-2015

Now this may sound crazy, but while MOST desktop screens cannot go beyond 75Hz (I've personally done 6 desktop displays like that and my friend tried his) - laptops can go waaay beyond that due to better components (sounds counter-intuitive, but laptop components are higher end to withstand heat and voltage fluctuations). So my lappy screen can go to 107Hz with zero artifacts or 120 with some pixels flickering while I've seen people do 180Hz with no artifacts. Crazy!

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13:48 Nov-15-2015

Oh and you can also do the OC via Nvidia control panel, but I have found that CRU gives me more bang than the control panel.
And another thing to mind is that this OC works like a native thing. So once done - it just works, games work fine and you can even do 4K DSR with whatever refresh rate you're running at :)
If anyone needs more info - just drop me a PM :)

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15:34 Nov-15-2015

Wow! Impressive...+1 to your reputation for that info!!

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16:44 Nov-15-2015

Thanks, dude! Much appreciated :)
I'd be intrigued to see whether you could get your 144Hz display up to 180 or so - would be badass!

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16:48 Nov-15-2015

I have no idea and kinda scared to try. Knowing my luck I would mess up my new monitor and the GF would have my ballz lol

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16:54 Nov-15-2015

I wonder why there is such a high premium for monitors over 60Hz?

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21:37 Nov-15-2015

That would probably be the components inside. You need a better panel to begin with to reduce ghosting, latency and make sure the color reproductions stays good when switching at that increased speed. Then you have more bandwidth to deal with (twice for 120Hz and even more for 144Hz!), so the internal chips need more juice and better connectors. High quality capacitors inside. And so on...
That would be my guess, personally.

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18:36 Nov-14-2015

First of all, great article with the, in my opinion, essence: "...it may easily happen that a graphics card which scored lower in average fps comparisons, may actually provide more enjoyable and smoother results during gameplay."


Secondly, I can adapt to a stable, lower frame rate, but not to a higher frame rate with spikes I can't (accurately) predict :D > So I will get distracted during many fast-paced Platformer games I play and lose my timing & accuracy...On the other hand, it wouldn't really be a problem with for ex. Puzzle Platformers that are mostly slow-paced. So it depends, but I never really experience those stutterings & drops. Although I have a low-end rig, I choose my games wisely and will, without regret, avoid games I can't run properly. And it's mostly 2D in my case anyway. So it depends? Actually not, because steadiness is crucial! I just think my adaptibility is immense ^^

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19:31 Nov-14-2015

I play racing arcade games a lot (aside from Witcher III and Age Of Empires III heh), and every single stutter is noticeable for me at high speeds :D

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20:27 Nov-14-2015

Yeah stable frame rates are a must for fast moving/quick response time games for sure

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23:49 Nov-14-2015

I'd say it's where a high refresh rate panel helps a LOT. Reduces input/output latency a great deal.

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11:26 Nov-15-2015

Makes sense ;) Especially when drifting in corners? :D
Some examples:



  • Burnout Paradise: worked better than expected, but I had to disable Ambient Occlusion (I think...) to avoid stutterings.

  • NFS The Run (not Arcade of course): well, just 30FPS on medium - high; stable, but almost not acceptable at that rate. Got frame drops in Multiplayer :P Doesn't count...

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17:23 Nov-14-2015

I prefer to keep steady frames over the higher graphic. In many games I lower the graphic , mostly shadows etc. , just to keep constant 60 fps. Frame drops drive me nuts

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17:59 Nov-14-2015

I always lower shadows too, usually because I don't see a noticeable difference between medium/high/ultra, and rather turn on SSAO/HBAO ;)

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18:32 Nov-14-2015

same except it kinda kills me inside to lower the graphics thats y i upgraded from a 770 to a 980. my 77 could handle most games 60 fps ultra but it has some fps drops under 60 that drived me nuts

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19:30 Nov-14-2015

haha, I upgraded from GTX770 to GTX980Ti, but because of monitor resolution and my brother who now has that GTX770 :))

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19:36 Nov-14-2015

I upgraded from two 760 in sli to 980ti. Mostly because they only had 2gb of vram. The gpu's themself were capable of the most and probably still are. But 2gb of vram is just not enough.

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20:52 Nov-14-2015

I'm quiet happy with my 280x , can run most of the games on ultra but like I mention before frame drops are not for me, so I lower graphics to high just for steady fps. Anyway is it really so noticeable difference between high and ultra? I don;t think so

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Ryzen 7 3700X 8-Core 3.6GHz GeForce RTX 2080 EVGA XC Ultra Gaming 8GB 32GB
100% Yes [5 votes]
| 60FPS, Medium, 1080p
Ryzen 7 4800H 8-Core 2.9GHz GeForce GTX 1650 Ti 4GB 8GB