It's kind of the opposite of what we've come to expect from PC gaming, but Oculus has announced it's done some optimisation from its end and it's managed to lower the Oculus Rift minimum system requirements originally announced back in mid-2015. Oculus has got tricksy with some new "asynchronous spacewarp" tech, eliminating dropped frames and allowing a game which runs natively at 45 FPS to be output at 90 frames per second.

From the sounds of things it's a similar technology to that being used in the PlayStation VR. That uses an interpolation method known as 'asynchronous reprojection' to double the frame rate from 60 frames per second to 120 FPS.

Oculus Rift New Minimum System Requirements

  • OS: Windows 7 64-bit Service Pack 1 Or Newer
  • CPU: Intel Core i3-6100 3.7 GHz or AMD FX-4350 4.3 GHz
  • RAM: 8 GB System Memory
  • GPU RAM: 2GB Video Memory or greater
  • GPU: GeForce GTX 960 or Radeon R9 380
  • Inputs: 2x USB 3.0 Ports
  • Output: Compatible HDMI 1.3 Video Output

Oculus Rift Previous Minimum System Requirements

  • OS: Windows 7 64-bit Service Pack 1 Or Newer
  • CPU: Intel Core i5-4590 3.3 GHz or AMD FX-8350 4.0 GHz
  • RAM: 8 GB System Memory
  • GPU RAM: 4GB Video Memory or greater
  • GPU: GeForce GTX 970 or Radeon R9 290
  • Inputs: 2x USB 3.0 Ports 
  • Output: Compatible HDMI 1.3 Video Output

What it's meant is that both the graphics card and CPU requirements have taken a dip. While previously a GTX 970 or Radeon R9 290 was required, now all you need is a 2GB GTX 960 or Radeon R9 380. That's quite a jump down, meaning you now only need a mid-tier graphics card to run VR. On this basis I expect the upcoming GTX 1050 Ti will be perfect for it.

Processor demands take a similarly large dip. While the Core i3-6100 is a relatively new Skylake CPU, it's right at the low end of the spectrum. The AMD FX-4350 is positively budget these days as well, particularly considering the raft of price cuts AMD has brought in to shift excess units of its FX-4000 series in preparation for Zen.

All in it now means you can probably put together a VR-ready gaming PC for around $500, which isn't a bad deal at all. You'll then need the $600 Oculus Rift headset though. And the $199 Touch controllers. Oh, and the $79 tracking station. But you get my point.

With the system requirements dropping for the Oculus Rift does it make the headset itself a more tempting purchase? Or do you think these minimum specs are just going to be outdated quickly anyway? Let us know!