First AMD 400 Series Chipset Appears in PCI-CIG Listing, Paves Way for Ryzen 2 CPUs

Written by Neil Soutter on Sat, Dec 30, 2017 10:00 AM

It’s looking as if AMD is gearing up for the launch of its next generation of Ryzen processors, the first of which are rumoured to be launching in Q1 2018. A new listing for an AMD 400-series chipset on PCI-SIG (those responsible for determining PCI Express base specifications) has let the cat out of the bag early, as well as indicating AMD will have a whole new family of motherboards inbound to accompany its next-generation CPUs.

The current line up of 300 series chipsets produced by AMD and its hardware partners are available in X370, B350, A320, X300 and A/B300. Aside from the GPU and CPU (which operate of PCIe 3.0 lanes), these are all limited to PCIe 2.0 lanes, which restricts the potential bandwidth. According to the PCI-SIG listing, the 400-series chipsets will support PCIe 3.0, offering transfer speeds of up to 8 GT/s.

The benefit of AMD 400-series is that additional peripherals could utilise this additional bandwidth. While CPUs and GPUs won’t benefit, it does open the door for more M.2 memory slots.

An additional nugget of info gleaned from the listing is that AMD’s next-gen 400 series won’t support DDR5 or PCIe 4.0, unsurprisingly. These technologies are right around the corner, but it sounds as if AMD’s Ryzen 2 processors are coming a little too soon for AMD to get support out there.

If you’re currently rocking a 300-series motherboard then fret not. The benefits are minor, and AMD has been pretty clear about the upgrade path going forward. All current AM4 motherboards should support Ryzen 2 CPUs, and indeed even Zen 2, ensuring they won’t be obsolete for a good few years yet. AMD’s current CPU roadmap indicates AM4 support until at least 2020. The downside is you’re going to have to sacrifice those extra juicy PCIe 3.0 lanes.

AMD AM4 400 Series motherboards promise to be just an incremental step then, but the altogether more pertinent point is that the cogs are turning and Ryzen 2 is inbound. Fingers crossed we hear something during CES 2018 next week.

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16:29 Dec-30-2017

Lol AMD is the joke of the year. If not for their weak cpus this year they would’ve tanked.

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16:41 Dec-30-2017

What ?

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20:00 Dec-30-2017

AMD Ryzen has good performance they put Intel under pressure

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20:14 Dec-30-2017

If not for their "weak" CPUs , Intel would have released Coffee Lake in 2018 and not rush its release 6 months in advance ,also due to their ThreadRipper CPUs intel made a push for 12+ cores on the HEDT platform

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20:15 Dec-30-2017

yes they are weaker than some of intel CPUs in gaming , but at a much lower price overall i have no problem getting 5-10 fps less if that means i will benefit in other ways

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23:50 Dec-30-2017

FriskyPanda
Well both AMD and Intel make weak CPUs, so you can't do much to change that... and it's the best the consumer has, so we don't have much of a choice, do we now?

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23:00 Jan-04-2018

Typical fanboy talk.

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08:58 Jan-05-2018

Are you high?

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11:06 Dec-30-2017

If their gaming performance comes at par or above the intel CPUs I might get a ryzen instead of an 8600k

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17:10 Dec-30-2017

dont think so

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23:45 Dec-31-2017

Its already is pretty close.
Only issue is that developers will need abit of time to adjust to Ryzen. By the time Ryzen 2 hits, upcoming games would run great.

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01:54 Jan-01-2018

Newer games that started development after Ryzen came out should definitely see an improvement compared to those that had already started development before.

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10:03 Dec-30-2017

If Ryzen 7 ( 2nd generation ) have better performance that 1st generation, I could get one with changing mobo ( actually have A320 chipset )
Do you think it could be great ?

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10:15 Dec-30-2017

Well next year 12nm Ryzen will have just clock speed increases, but a jump from a Ryzen 3 to 7 will always be a good idea, also a b350 motherboard or whatever equivalent comes out next year.

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10:24 Dec-30-2017

as far as I know (correct me if I'm wrong) A series (no OC, no SLI/Xfire) B (OC, no Sli/Xfire) X(OC, SLI/Xfire support). You can check here: https://www.gamersnexus.net/guides/2763-amd-chipset-comparison-x370-b350-a320

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17:11 Dec-30-2017

you are somewhat right , some motherboards on the B350 side CAN have multi GPUs , for instance the Asus B350-F can have up to 3 gpus in CrossFire

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00:36 Jan-01-2018

SLI is no longer mobo dependent as it just uses the PCI-E lanes, SLI on the other hand is NOT supported on A320 and B350 motherboards, either X300 or X370 motherboard is what you need for SLI.


The main problem with the A320 motherboards are the VRMs and the entire power delivery system on the motherboards is made for low power components, everything above a gtx 1060/RX 570(in terms of power) and Ryzen 5 1400 will push the VRMs and the entire power delivery system of the motherboards to their limits and beyond to the point of shortening their life and in worst case scenario killing them real quick.

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11:43 Jan-01-2018

Correction: "Crossfire* is no longer..." my bad...

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Can They Run... |

| 60FPS, Medium, 1080p
Ryzen R5 1400 GeForce GTX 1060 32GB
Ryzen R5 1400 GeForce GTX 1060 32GB
0% No [1 votes]
| 60FPS, Ultra, 1080p
Ryzen 5 3600 6-Core 3.6GHz Radeon RX 6600 8GB 16GB