Build the ultimate gaming PC for less than $1200

Written by D3ATHKeeper on Fri, Nov 29, 2019 4:58 PM

Update: We will update this article shortly. Due to the continued hardware component supply issue across the globe, we have not felt that it is very representative to adjust this build for some time. 

ORIGINAL: Building a gaming PC, while more expensive than your typical console, need not cost the world. Some will say you need to spend thousands upon thousands  in order to stay current with PC gaming but this is not the case.

The core of a PC is useful for just about everything. We all use PCs in our everyday lives, so we pretty much all need one. What separates an ordinary PC from a gaming PC is, usually, the graphics card. Your GPU will usually be the most expensive component of your PC build and it’ll also have the biggest impact on visuals and performance. But, it’s also important not to totally scrimp on the other components though, as the right hardware can last you for years.

With huge games like Cyberpunk 2077 and Red Dead Redemption 2 on the horizon, we figure it’s the perfect time to be thinking about a new PC build to enjoy these AAA games looking and running at their finest.

Ultimate PC Gaming Build for Under $1200

So we’ve set ourselves the target of $1200. All in. $1200, from scratch, and you’ll have a complete gaming PC with a capable GPU, CPU, plenty of RAM, both HDD & SSD storage, a monitor, mouse, keyboard, and headset. Everything you could possibly need to begin PC gaming with performance that exceeds consoles. 

We’ve settled on hitting under $1200 in order to provide the best price to performance we can find for our money. Now this isn’t about saving the pennies to get the absolute cheapest build possible, or spending ridiculous amounts of cash to get 4K running on Ultra with all the bells and whistles. This is for a PC build where you get what you pay for - quality performance for a reasonable price. We want to create the everyman PC build. So during this PC build guide for 2019 we will be aiming at the sort of PC most PC gamers, such as you and I, aim to have. 

  Component Current Price Why this component? 
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 2600 $135.00 AMD's Ryzen range is proving a top choice these days for its affordability versus Intel's chips. The new Ryzen 3000 series means the previous gen CPUs can be picked up dirt cheap. The 6-core Ryzen 5 2600 is an absolute bargain right now at $118.
Graphics Card Radeon RX 5700 XFX DD Ultra 8GB $339.99 The Radeon RX 5700 is the secret weapon in AMD's locker. Available for around $300, the RX 5700 offers performance within a few percentage points of the RTX 2060 Super for around $100 cheaper. You lose out on raytracing support but very few games support this feature right now.
Memory Corsair 16GB 3200MHz DDR4 $67.50 RAM is very cheap these days. We've come a long way from the sky-high prices in 2017. 16GB is more than enough for any modern game and 3200MHz memory can now be had for as low as $69.99.
Motherboard Asus TUF B450-Plus Gaming $115.28 Motherboards can easily be one of the most overwhelming components to purchase. For normal usage though, the Asus TUF B450-Plus Gaming is a great budget mobo that maximises value for money.
Case Fractal Design Focus G $49.88 The sky is the limit for case designs but in terms of great functionality for a low price, it's tough to beat the Fractal Design Focus G. It's small yet will house ATX motherboards and has plenty of space to tuck in extra storage and slots for up to five fans.
PSU Seasonic FOCUS Plus 650 Gold $109.99 The Seasonic FOCUS Plus 650 Gold is a great, inexpensive choice with plenty of headroom to power a RTX 5700 equivalent video card. 
SSD Crucial BX500 240GB $31.99 SSD storage can quickly become expensive but a small 240GB driver should be enough to get you up and running. Install your OS on this SSD for much faster boot times, and prioritise your most used game installs to this drive.
HDD Seagate BarraCuda 2TB $49.99 While far slower, traditional hard drivers are still much cheaper than SSDs for mass storage. A 2TB drive can be picked up for just $55 and it has room for around 40 or so 50GB games.
CPU Cooler Wraith Stealth Cooler $0.00 AMD's Ryzen 5 2600 comes with a Wraith Stealth Cooler bundled in. If you're just running at stock clocks this will do the job.
Display LG Ultragear 24GL600F-B $179.99 Arguably the best 1080p monitor around for price to performance. The LG 24GL600F-Bpacks a 144Hz refresh rate, 1ms response times, and a 24" TN display.
Keyboard Redragon K552 $32.99 At $33, the Redragon K552 is very cheap for a mechanical keyboard. It's also reliable though with a sturdy build quality, great feedback, and a simple, stylish design.
Mouse Cooler Master MM710 $49.99 With a unique hole-y design, the Cooler Master MM710 is the Swiss cheese of gaming mice. It's lightweight yet offers excellent performance with its top-tier optical sensor.
Headset HyperX Cloud Stinger $34.99 Proof that you need not spend a ton for a top quality gaming headset, the HyperX Cloud Stinger is ergonomic, has great sound quality and pro-grade condenser mic.
Total Price   $1,197.58  

** Special Offers - Items marked with the ** in our build will be experiencing a temporary special offer. These are usually timed special offers, so it might be that we have to switch them out when their prices return to "normal".

This is an ongoing project and this build will adapt and change based on newly released hardware and you. Yes, you. We'll be running regular polls for which components you believe are the weak link, and then we'll switch them out for something even better. Week by week, we'll be building the ultimate gaming PC to be found at this price point.

The process of actually building a PC has never been easier, but picking from all the different components is still as tricky as ever. Do you go for a future-proofed graphics card? Does it matter if you only have a 400W PSU? We're going to take these problems out of the equation by pooling all of our knowledge to ensure we've also got the best budget build you can get right now.

So this is everything you need for a gaming PC setup for under $1200. This build can play every game in the world today and includes a tower itself along with all the key components such as gaming monitor, mouse, keyboard, and headset. 

But this is just the start. It's time for you all to get your heads together in order to identify the weakest point of Ultimate PC Gaming Build for Under $1200. 

Which of these components would you like to switch out for something else? Get voting for the component which you'd like to change and we'll then run a further poll to decide what we're going to replace it with.

We want your recommended hardware suggestions for this build so pop them in the comments section below and the hardware suggestions with the most up-votes will be considered for inclusion in the build!

UPDATE: 22nd Nov, 2019 – During our latest community vote on the topic of “Which area should we try to boost?”, it unsurprisingly showed the GPU won in a landslide victory. Upgrading the system specs (CPU, Motherboard, RAM) achieved 16.34% of the votes while also taking the place for the second most voted option.

The options for upgrading our GPU will require a PSU upgrade too and I have chosen a reliable / top of the line PSU to accommodate the update. Seasonic FOCUS Plus 650 Gold for $109.99, which is a bit more expensive than our current PSU.

This leaves us with around $360 to spare to spent on a graphics card. We don't have to spend all of it on a GPU but this the upper limit based on the $1200 budget. The current build has a GeForce GTX 1660 Ti but, with the extra cash we now have, it could be possible to upgrade to a GeForce RTX 2060 or a Radeon RX 5700.

UPDATE: 1st Nov, 2019 - Following the recent, "Which storage solution is best?" poll, the option for a split hard drive (SSD+HDD) system to be used in our Best PC Build for $1200 won comfortably.

So let's take a look at the best storage drive option for our $1200 PC. People today prefer the fast 240GB SSD paired with a cheaper, larger 2TB HDD storage solution. This allows our PC to use a fast Solid State Drive (240GB SSD) for our operating system and some choice games we are most interested in playing.

Solid state delivers a much quicker and smoother loading experience that's very noticeable when loading between game levels or booting the PC or a game/application. The Hard Disk Drive (2TB HDD) provides us with a large chunk of storage space where we can put our downloaded games and movies.

Interestingly, the next popular option would have been to spend more on a larger 480GB SSD but with a smaller 1TB HDD. The reason for this setup is that some games are now as big as 175GB in size and so space on the 240GB SSD would be limited. Perhaps 20GB+ is taken up by an operating system and then we could probably only fit one or two of these massive games on the SSD at any one time. The typical gamer would have to do some shuffling and uninstalling to make room each time a new game was to be played on the SSD.

However, that game size issue only effects AAA games and it was the larger storage option with 2TB HDD that really got people to choose this option, because the majority of people still have relatively slow internet connections and don't want to have to download their data/content more than once, if they can help it.Which do I go for, more of the cheaper HDD storage or more of the faster SSD? So if your internet connection is pretty fast and you don't have data caps or pay for downloading GB's of data, then we would still advise you to consider the larger 480GB SSD, with a 1TB HDD. You can always buy more HDD space drives later and hook them up quite easily as your budget and needs arise. But it is a little more tricky to move the operating system from the 240SSD to a bigger 480SSD.

But the majority of people in the world fall into the side of slower download speeds and data caps/costs. So if you want to download and leave your games/data/movies on a storage device then you will be better off with more HDD space available and should consider going with the way our build is put together below.

 

What should our next price bracket be?

Login or Register to join the debate

Rep
0
Offline
04:58 Dec-02-2019

Yesterday i bought :


Ryzen 2700x 8 core
Rtx 2070 8gb
32 gb 3000 mhz ram
500 gb samsung ssd
Rgb case
B450 gaming plus
Some fans



  • free borderlands 3 and modern warfare and 3 momth game pass


For 1100$ in germany

0
Rep
49
Offline
03:11 Dec-02-2019

It's certainly not a bad result for the money, but I'm not really sure about it's longevity overall. There's no such thing as "future proof", and all PC's regardless of what you spend will face obsolescence eventually, the only question is when. Unless you can realistically afford it there's no real point going ultra high end, but at the same time going too far down the budget-build path will cost more in the long run. Upper-mid level is probably the ideal spot to aim for.

1
Rep
49
Offline
03:16 Dec-02-2019

I built my system about 6 years ago at this point, and apart from 2 additional HDD's I've done nothing at all to it. The only real weak point in the system, even now, is my GPU. I'll be swapping to a GTX 1660 Super sometime in the next week, but apart from that I expect at least another 2 years before I even really need to consider touching the big 3 (mobo/cpu/ram). If only CPU sockets were universal the PC world would be a much cheaper place to live :/

1
Rep
61
Offline
admin approved badge
16:45 Nov-30-2019

Small correction needed - RAM is listed at $62.99 on Amazon, instead of the $69.99 listed here in this build.

0
Rep
93
Offline
senior admin badge
18:35 Dec-01-2019

It was on $69.99 when I updated them, I think it got changed to $62.99 later that day. Amazon also hides their result for when you select "New".. probably because it's on back order now. I changed the price for the RAM though

0
Rep
28
Offline
12:09 Nov-30-2019

Could we get a ssd vs nvme ssd up for debate. I have been eyeing up the ADATA XPG SX8200 PRO 1TB M.2 PCIE(that can at times rival the samsung 970 pro) that is about 135€ thats not that much expensive than a sata 1tb ssd. I do know the sequential super high reads/writes are not something you really notice as a average user(not a professional). But for a little more money you do get faster random speeds(makes it feel snappier). I find it would make a interesting discussion.

0
Rep
272
Offline
admin approved badge
13:44 Nov-30-2019

I personally have not noticed any speed changes moving from an 850 Pro SATA SSD, to a 950 Pro M.2 NVMe, back to a Crucial MX300 SATA SSD. Not even game load times. A multitude of videos around the net also show that the difference is either not there at all or is, in some select titles, very miniscule.


So from all that and my knowledge of tech - I put NVMe drives for gaming into the "snake oil" category, especially those companies that sell them in RAID configs, UNLESS it's pretty much AS CHEAP AS a SATA SSD. If not - spend money elsewhere.

1
Rep
76
Offline
admin approved badge
21:25 Nov-30-2019

It highly depends on the use. For everyday use and gaming, gains from SATA to NVMe are very minimal. The biggest numbers they advertise are not ones you will doing with those workloads. Transfer speeds are great, but how many times you do 50 or 100GB one big file transfers from or to NVMe from equally fast storage? Probably not that often. And even if you do, it is bottlenecked by your internet.

1
Rep
76
Offline
admin approved badge
21:25 Nov-30-2019

Meaning this is not what you will often use. Game installing and downloading is just a thing you do from slower medium, be it DVD or internet. Second large numbers they love to advertise is random reads and writes with queue depth of 32 and thread count of 4. Q32T4. But that is not what games and everyday use does either. That is server type of workload, with multiple virtual machines...

1
Rep
76
Offline
admin approved badge
21:26 Nov-30-2019

... all working at same time. So you got ton of stuff that has to be done at once. No, for everyday use and gaming you need to look at one thing they don't advertise. Because numbers shrink a lot and aren't that dramatically different between NVMe and SATA SSD. Random small file reads and writes with queue depth of 1 and thread count of 1. Because that is about 90% of what happens.

1
Rep
76
Offline
admin approved badge
21:26 Nov-30-2019

Just doing quick Googling, 4KiB Q1T1 result for Samsung 970EVO was 52,85MB/S read and 213,3MB/s write, on the other side, Crucial MX500 SATA SSD 47,5MB/s read and 143,7MB/s write. And you will do more reading than writing in most cases of regular use. And sure, write is behind, but not that terribly. Currently MX500 is about 100USD, 970EVO is 150USD, which is fairly big difference.

1
Rep
76
Offline
admin approved badge
21:26 Nov-30-2019

And lets talk about game loading a bit too. When loading a game, it is not one big load of that 7GB textures.dat, that dat file is archive with smaller files, which turns loading from one big sequential read to small random file read. Hence why Q1T1 is important here. Plus not to mention loading is a lot more than just copying files into RAM. CPU has to do a lot of initializing.

1
Rep
76
Offline
admin approved badge
21:26 Nov-30-2019

Which slows loading down. Hence why difference is even smaller. Also games won't really load at high queue depths or thread counts, because they do need to be compatible with wide variety of storage options. And while yes, sometimes you will get queue depth of 2 or 3, if you run all your launchers and they all update games at once. Provided connection is not the bottleneck.

1
Rep
76
Offline
admin approved badge
21:26 Nov-30-2019

But if you are doing something professional, like video editing, having NVMe scratch disk is huge, it really makes editing a ton smoother. Same goes if you run a lot of virtual machines at once. There are usecases for NVMe. But I unless you are building top of the line build and there is no other place to put your money. Just get SATA SSD or cheap NVMe, like Intel 660p 1TB or 2TB.

1
Rep
76
Offline
admin approved badge
21:27 Nov-30-2019

And yes, I mention 2TB, because if you are willing to add a "little" to get something like 970EVO, then you might as well add just a little more to get double the storage. for 2TB 660p, at bit north of 200USD. And in everyday use and gaming, you will notice extra storage more than speed difference.

1
Rep
28
Offline
08:09 Dec-01-2019

talking about Nvme or "faster than pc" ssd. Sony talked big about the possibilities of fast storage but will it only be used for exclusives really dont see games on pc having a ssd requirement.

0
Rep
76
Offline
admin approved badge
13:27 Dec-01-2019

They will eventually move towards taking better advantage, before they require it. Consoles having SSDs will help, because developers will be more incentivized to actually optimize for it on consoles. And some of that will definitely leak on PC as well. Especially since SSDs got a lot more affordable and common. But even with that I think SATA SSDs will last us for a long time too.

1
Rep
76
Offline
admin approved badge
13:30 Dec-01-2019

Since asset streaming won't really be one big sequential read but also likely will do lower queue depth of random small file reads. But I do believe that eventually, talking long term, there will be more and more incentive to leverage extra performance SSDs can offer. Especially as consoles are all guaranteed to have SSD and generational leap forward happens after transition period.

1
Rep
-17
Offline
09:19 Nov-30-2019

Even if the price is less than $1,200. The price isn't the same thing on other countries.

2
Rep
15
Offline
admin approved badge
13:42 Nov-23-2019

GTX 1660 Ti.


Because better price to performance ratio and because it's not AMD.

1
Rep
24
Offline
16:04 Nov-29-2019

1660 super even better, just 5fps less for $50 less :P

2
Rep
15
Offline
admin approved badge
03:33 Nov-30-2019

Yes, But I was simply picking a choice that was on the poll at the time and the 1660 Super was not one of them.

0
Rep
60
Offline
19:39 Nov-29-2019

nope, how about an 8800 GTS for 320 MB of raw power!?

4
Rep
23
Offline
10:20 Nov-23-2019

Radeon is a no brainer here....

0
Rep
61
Offline
admin approved badge
10:17 Nov-23-2019

5700 but that 240 GB SSD is looking troublesome.

2
Rep
61
Offline
admin approved badge
16:31 Nov-24-2019

Wonder what the AMD options will be in the next couple of months. They should have some competition for the 1660 Super and Ti.

0
Rep
58
Offline
admin approved badge
16:45 Nov-24-2019

the 5500 competes with the 1650S, nothing above

0
Rep
61
Offline
admin approved badge
20:59 Nov-24-2019

For the time being yes. Who knows if theres a 5500 XT, or a 5600 series coming after.


Apparently the 5500 isn't faster than the 580. It's about the same or a little under, while consuming much less power. That's the big take.


But where is AMD's answer to the 1660S / Ti is what everybody's wondering.

0
Rep
4
Offline
06:37 Nov-23-2019

still GTX 1060 best...

1
Rep
52
Offline
07:17 Nov-23-2019

coughs rdr2 coughs

3
Rep
386
Offline
admin approved badge
00:46 Nov-23-2019

Those prices are horrific, but if I had to choose, I'd go for the RX 5700 or rtx 2060, doesn't really matter when they are the same price.

3
Rep
93
Offline
senior admin badge
00:57 Nov-23-2019

The RX 5700 has the MSRP price while the RTX 2060 is $10 above MSRP. Both are actually on a special for $329.99 at the moment, but we currently have the list prices listed for them. Both are also currently the cheapest in their class at the moment on Amazon.

0
Rep
386
Offline
admin approved badge
09:02 Nov-23-2019

No the thing is they are overpriced. The rx 5700 and rtx 2060 should cost 250$ MSRP +10-15$ for the 3rd party ones.

1
Rep
76
Offline
admin approved badge
20:45 Nov-22-2019

Personally I would go for RX5700, 2060 Super performance for 2060 price. 2060 can barely do raytracing if you go to 720p, for which I would ask what decade it is... So not worth it and while 1660Ti can make sens,it only does so if 1660 Super is too close to its price.Otherwise you might as well take minor loss fro lower cost.But with graphic card,I would want to get as good as possible for gaming.

2
Rep
-1
Offline
16:43 Nov-29-2019

Also you can BIOS flash or use the PPT mod with the RX 5700, then you get the performance of a RX 5700XT. Yes, it gets hot, but a careful tuning of the fan

0
Rep
-1
Offline
16:43 Nov-29-2019

curve solves the heating issues easily. At least that's what I did and can totally confirm it.

0
Rep
76
Offline
admin approved badge
19:55 Nov-29-2019

Yeah, for whoever is fine with getting "their hands dirty" and put in bit of effort, it really isn't hard to flash and do the mod. Especially partner models will have no issue handling extra heat. Some might not even need much in terms of fan curve adjustment. Though this will likely stay mostly enthusiast thing, which is why I didn't mention it. But AMD really does give you options to tweak it.

0
Rep
28
Offline
16:13 Nov-22-2019

best you can afford

0
Rep
58
Offline
admin approved badge
15:38 Nov-22-2019

1660 super instead

1
Rep
93
Offline
senior admin badge
15:53 Nov-22-2019

You want to downgrade for a CPU upgrade or?

0
Rep
58
Offline
admin approved badge
15:56 Nov-22-2019

maybe... or just keep that cash and buy a beer :)

1
Rep
93
Offline
senior admin badge
16:11 Nov-22-2019

That's true, I guess some people don't always look at trying to push the graphics and the budget as much as they can. We're just seeing what people can get with a budget of $1200 while using some quality components. I know some people will also be happy that we chose an even better PSU now. It's not in the build yet, but will be added when the GPU is final

0
Rep
94
Offline
11:14 Nov-19-2019

When I build my pc, I choose the CPU to be the focus area and later buy a gpu. So far I did that and now have a good overclocked 960 in my system. I chose the CPU so I could later (after 4/5 years) upgrade the gpu to another mid end and game for another year or 3 on it. Maybe it will work, maybe not. I should've bought the 6th gen, but decided to go with the 4th gen, because a 6th gen build was -50 to 100 euro more expensive. So far it's good, but I was also thinking about building a whole new system in a smaller form factor.

0
Rep
94
Offline
11:14 Nov-19-2019

When I build my pc, I choose the CPU to be the focus area and later buy a gpu. So far I did that and now have a good overclocked 960 in my system. I chose the CPU so I could later (after 4/5 years) upgrade the gpu to another mid end and game for another year or 3 on it. Maybe it will work, maybe not. I should've bought the 6th gen, but decided to go with the 4th gen, because a 6th gen build was -50 to 100 euro more expensive. So far it's good, but I was also thinking about building a whole new system in a smaller form factor.

0
Rep
5
Offline
15:17 Nov-18-2019

I would argue either GPU or PSU is the first upgrade to make, don't trust that 80+ bronze will hold you over forever, especially if you have a small room, it can get pretty toasty in there.

1
Rep
154
Offline
admin approved badge
01:43 Nov-19-2019

Agree, the first build I used a Corsair CX 500 bronze rated. It lasted for about 2 years then one day the pins from the 24-pin connector completely blew out. Now I'm 5 years into with the EVGA SuperNOVA 750W still strong and a beast.

0
Rep
216
Offline
admin approved badge
02:24 Nov-19-2019

Probably just bad luck. I've had my CX500 powering my system since 2013 and I've changed most components since then except case, hdd and the psu. Survived quite a few lightning strikes and stuff and still going xD

0
Rep
154
Offline
admin approved badge
22:36 Nov-19-2019

I probably got a defect then.

0
Rep
94
Offline
11:17 Nov-19-2019

Then you really have some trust issues in electronic components. I'm running an SE530W from thermaltake (I've read that it wasn't the best choice for a 80+ bronze), but it works fine for 4 years on my overclocked cpu, gpu and ram.

1
Rep
272
Offline
admin approved badge
00:44 Nov-18-2019

I'll be the odd one here, probably, but I vote for the storage. Games are getting larger and larger these days and an SSD is pretty much a must if you don't want to have excessive loading times and stuttering, especially in open world and AAA titles. The CPU/GPU combo is fine for the budget build, but it's the storage that's a major let-down to me here.

1
Rep
94
Offline
11:19 Nov-19-2019

I wouldn't really go for that, well maybe now I would. 4 Years ago, my 250gb ssd was 103 euro. Nowadays you can score an 1TB nvme ssd for -130 euro. That'd be not only perfect for games, but also the OS and other programs. In the case of the build in the article, SSD for sure and kinda ditch the HDD (unless you need to store movies, etc)

0
Rep
272
Offline
admin approved badge
17:59 Nov-19-2019

I'd argue that most people considering such a build would be upgrading from some sort of a previous PC (be it an old PC or a laptop), in which case they probably already have a HDD they can use (either external or internal, for which you can buy a cheap enclosure or just use it an an internal again). If that's the case - SSD all the way for sure.

1
Rep
61
Offline
admin approved badge
16:30 Nov-17-2019

Isn't the 1660 Ti kind of pointless now that the 1660 Super exists, which performs the same but for cheaper ?


I think we can just about squeeze in the RX 5700 XT. Currently we're at $1080. Minus the 1660 Ti ($280) + the 5700 XT ($400) = $1200 YAY ! :D

0
Rep
93
Offline
senior admin badge
16:53 Nov-17-2019

I looked at some benchmarks when it released and it was weaker than the Ti back then. If I'm not mistaken, it actually landed right between the 1660 and 1660 Ti performance wise in most of the games I saw tested.

0
Rep
61
Offline
admin approved badge
15:02 Nov-18-2019

It was much closer to the Ti than the base 60, which is why I said what I did. I'm pretty sure Linus said the Super is the one to get and has made the Ti pointless. That's how close the performance was. It was definitely not in the middle. I only saw Gamers Nexus, Hardware Unboxed and LinusTT's benchmarks.

0
Rep
93
Offline
senior admin badge
16:10 Nov-18-2019

I just checked and I watched this benchmark. It shows in most of the benchmarks that the GPU is more or less between the 1660 and 1660 Ti. The benchmarks aren't the same everywhere though, because, if I remember correctly, he stated that some reviewers might be getting overclocked editions. I also did notice that the prices aren't like they were announced, so I'll look into this in the future and see what the best option is. I was actually hoping AMD would be releasing something competitive in that price soon, but that might still happen this year.

0
Rep
61
Offline
admin approved badge
17:40 Nov-18-2019

Yea. Kinda confirms that it's a touch closer to the Ti than the base 60. But not much in it. 5% worse than a Ti and 8% better than the base 60.


I'm also wondering why AMD has been entirely absent from the 200 - 350 range for so long. Hopefully there's something cooking other than the 5500 which seems to be an entry level replacement. Are they still making new 580s and 590s ?

0
Rep
93
Offline
senior admin badge
18:47 Nov-18-2019

I haven't checked in a while, but I would assume they do. If not then they would only have the Vega 56, Vega 64, RX 5700 and RX 5700 XT.. which is a lot less than Nvidia.

0
Rep
61
Offline
admin approved badge
12:02 Nov-19-2019

They have the Vegas only. Above that ($350) is the 5700s. So yeah they don't have anything in the 200 - 350 range. Other than the Vegas if they're even available inside that range. Only one Gigabyte version is available for 280, the others are north of 370

0
Rep
41
Offline
04:33 Nov-17-2019

I think I'm the only one who choose GPU.

3
Rep
23
Offline
08:52 Nov-17-2019

You're not...I too chose it..in my mind this cpu can't possibly bottleneck a gpu...hell my cpu (desktop equivalent) wouldn't bottleneck most of them, so no point in wasting money there.

0
Rep
216
Offline
admin approved badge
03:44 Nov-17-2019

IMO it's more important to have a better CPU than GPU as it opens doors for GPU upgrades without having too much bottleneck. You don't suffer as much with a GPU bottleneck as you do with a CPU one, speaking from experience.

3

Can They Run... |

| 30FPS, Low, 1080p
Xeon Processor E5620 Radeon RX 570 4GB 8GB
| 60FPS, Ultra, 1080p
Ryzen 5 5600H 6-Core 3.3GHz GeForce RTX 3060 Mobile 16GB
100% Yes [1 votes]
| 60FPS, High, 1080p
Core i7-11700K 8-Core 3.6GHz GeForce RTX 3060 Ultra 16GB
| 60FPS, Ultra, 1440p
Core i7-11800H 8-Core 1.90GHz GeForce RTX 3080 16GB Mobile 32GB
100% Yes [1 votes]
| 60FPS, Ultra, 1440p
Core i5-6300HQ 2.3GHz GeForce GTX 960M 4GB 12GB
0% No [1 votes]
Core i5-3470 3.2GHz GeForce GTX 750 Ti Asus OC 2GB Edition 8GB
| 30FPS, Medium, 1080p
Core i5-4570 3.2GHz Intel HD Graphics 4600 Desktop 8GB
| 60FPS, High, 1080p
Ryzen 5 3500X 6-Core 3.6GHz GeForce RTX 3080 Gigabyte Eagle OC 10GB 16GB
100% Yes [2 votes]
| 60FPS, High, 1080p
Core i5-9300H 4-Core 2.4GHz GeForce GTX 1660 Ti 6GB 16GB
0% No [2 votes]
Core i5-4460 3.2GHz Radeon RX 570 XFX RS Black 4GB 8GB
100% Yes [1 votes]
| 60FPS, Medium, 1080p
Ryzen 5 5600X 6-Core 3.7GHz GeForce GTX 1660 Super MSI Ventus XS OC 6GB 16GB
100% Yes [4 votes]
Core i7-6700HQ 4-Core 2.6GHz GeForce GTX 950M v2 4GB 8GB
| 60FPS, Low, 720p
Core i3-9100F 4-Core 3.6GHz GeForce GTX 970 Asus Strix OC 4GB Edition 32GB
50% Yes [2 votes]
| 60FPS, Medium, 1080p
Core i5-2500 3.3GHz GeForce GTX 1050 Ti Gigabyte OC 4GB 8GB
100% Yes [1 votes]
Core i5-5200U 2.2GHz Intel HD Graphics 5500 Mobile 8GB
| 60FPS, Low, 1080p
Core i5-4460 3.2GHz Radeon R9 280 Gigabyte WindForce 3X OC 3GB Edition 16GB
100% Yes [2 votes]
| 60FPS, High, 4k
Core i9-10900K 10-Core 3.7GHz GeForce RTX 3070 Gigabyte Vision OC 8GB 64GB
0% No [2 votes]
Core i5-3210M 2.5GHz Radeon HD 7500G 8GB
| 30FPS, High, 1080p
Ryzen 5 2600X 6-Core 3.6GHz Radeon RX 5600 XT Sapphire Pulse 6GB 16GB
0% No [1 votes]
| 60FPS, Medium, 720p
Core i3-4030U 1.9GHz Intel HD Graphics 4400 Mobile 2GB
0% No [1 votes]