Okay, we’re all PC fans here, but the next generation of consoles are nearly out and some of us do enjoy discussing the new consoles and the hardware within them. So with the recent announcement of the next-gen Xbox consoles launching on November 10th, Microsoft have revealed the official specs for the Xbox Series S, and I thought it would be interesting to take a look and compare the two.

If you don’t know, the next-gen Xbox consoles are coming in two different flavors: The Xbox Series X priced at $499, and the all-digital Xbox Series S for $299. Obviously the Series S is more catered towards those who may not be so lucky to be able to afford the more expensive version, but unfortunately it looks like this may prove to be a more costly approach later down the line. First though, let's take a look at the official specs for the Xbox Series X and Xbox Series S:

Console Xbox Series X Xbox Series S
CPU 8-Core AMD Zen 2 CCPU @ 3.8GHz (3.6GHz with SMT enabled) 8-Core AMD Zen 2 CCPU @ 3.6GHz (3.4GHz with SMT enabled)
GPU AMD RDNA 2 GPU (52 CUs @ 1.825GHz) AMD RDNA 2 GPU (20 CUs @ 1.565GHz)
GPU Power 12.15 TFLOPS 4 TFLOPS
System on Chip (SoC) Custom 7nm Enhanced SoC Custom 7nm Enhanced SoC
RAM 16GB GDDR6 RAM (10GB @ 560GB/s + 6GB @ 336GB/s) 10GB GDDR6 RAM (8GB @ 224GB/s + 2GB @ 56GB/s)
Performance Target 4K @ 60fps and up to 120fps 1440p @ 60fps and up to 120fps
Storage 1TB PCIe Gen 4 NVME SSD (2.4GB/s uncompressed, 4.8GB/s compressed) 512GB PCIe Gen 4 NVME SSD (2.4GB/s uncompressed, 4.8GB/s compressed)
Expandable Storage 1TB Expansion Card (matches internal storage exactly) 1TB Expansion Card (matches internal storage exactly)
Backwards Compatibility Xbox One, Xbox 360, and Xbox games + Xbox One gaming accessories Xbox One, Xbox 360, and Xbox games + Xbox One gaming accessories
Disc Drive 4K UHD Blu-ray Digital Only
Display Out HMDI 2.1 HDMI 2.1
MSRP $499 $299

Looking at the specs above for the Xbox Series S compared to the Xbox Series X, there’s not actually a whole lot of difference. Obviously the Series S has much lower performance power, but despite that is still targeting 1440p resolution with frame rates of 60fps and up to 120fps. It also has half the initial storage space and is a purely digital-only console with no disc drive.

Aside from that though, the Series S is a great deal for being able to play next-gen games at great frame rates and resolution in addition to ray tracing support, which certainly makes it a decent alternative to the Series X.

However, as many comments online have pointed out, grabbing yourself an Xbox Series S may end up being more costly in the long run, as the prices of expandable storage solutions (especially when it comes to SSDs) could easily soon catch up to $200 price difference between the Series S and Series X. Plus, as the Xbox Series S is a digital-only console you can forget about buying second-hand games at your local retailer, and you’ll either have to fork over the full price money for a game or wait for a sale.

Of course, there’s always the Xbox All Access option, which means you can pay for the console at a monthly price with no upfront costs. Plus you get access to the Xbox Game Pass for consoles and PC as well as an EA Play subscription now. So maybe these problems won’t matter, but it’s certainly interesting to talk about.

What do you think? How do you feel about the Xbox Series S specs? Is it a good alternative to the Xbox Series X? Or will it prove to be more costly in the long run? Let us know!

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