DDR5 memory to launch later this year, specs revealed and up to 6400MHz speeds in 2022

Written by Stuart Thomas on Tue, Apr 27, 2021 4:28 PM

The first batch of consumer DDR5 memory modules have now entered mass production and are awaiting to launch later this year. The new generation of RAM is sure to be exciting for some as the next-gen PC platforms aim to support the new memory type with enhanced speeds and performance, and some of the specs have already been revealed.

Micron’s new DDR5 chips have now been delivered to several brands who are currently in the stage of validating the memory modules along with board partners like ASUS, MSI, ASRock, Gigabyte and more. This means they will soon be moving into trial mass production before launching later this year.

If you’ve been following the anticipation of DDR5 memory, you’ll know the exciting part is learning about what kind of speeds we can expect and at what sizes, and DDR5 certainly doesn’t disappoint at all. Here’s the full specifications roadmap released by memory brand Asgard:

Size Speed Voltage Timings Release Production
16GB 4800MHz 1.1V CL=40 2021 Mass production
32GB 4800MHz
5600MHz CL=46 2021-2022 Under development
64GB 5600MHz
6400MHz CL=52 2022-2023 To be determined
128GB 5600MHz CL=46 2021-2022 Under development
6400MHz CL=52 2022-2023 To be determined

So by the end of this year we should be seeing both 16GB and 32GB DDR5 memory available for desktops and feature 4800MHz speeds and CL40 timings. That’s pretty good, but these are so far the lowest standard speeds.

Moving onto the 2021-2022 timeframe, we’ll see 32GB, 64GB, and 128GB DDR5 kits at 5600MHz and CL46 timings. Apparently the 128GB kits are looking at around a mid-2020 launch, but some 128GB kits could come out sooner than that but at higher price points.

Finally, during 2022-2023 we should see some more extreme speeds with 64GB and 128GB kits featuring ridiculous 6400MHz speeds with CL52 timings. 6400MHz is also the maximum standard limit for DDR5 memory, and these will be the mainstream models in 2022-2023.

What is incredible about this is that these will be the standard speeds, so you can expect overclocked memory kits to be even faster (some manufacturers are even reporting speeds of 10,000MHz for kits that are currently in the Research phase!).

Early performance benchmarks indicate DDR5 should offer over twice the performance of DDR4. However, if you want to use these new memory kits you will need to wait for the launch of Intel’s Alder Lake processors later this year as well, which will be the first to support DDR5 memory.

What do you think? Are you excited for DDR5? Will you be upgrading your hardware for DDR5? What kind of memory do you have installed right now? Let us know!

Will you upgrade your PC for DDR5?

How much RAM do you currently have installed?

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00:32 May-01-2021

APUs will love DDR5

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17:41 May-04-2021

Especially 6400mhz dual channel ddr5.

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21:53 May-05-2021

No doubt.


Now imagine how a 10000Mhz kit will affect the APU.
I honestly have no idea if the latencies will be too high for gaming...

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23:57 May-05-2021

Not at all, gpus don't really get affected by high latencies and games don't store too frequently loaded and read data into the RAM for latency to be a big factor.

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23:45 May-06-2021

The OCer in me still wants to see how that Frankenstein combo would work out.

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19:47 Apr-28-2021

i don't play the latest games, nor do i make any money off games so i'll be happy to stock on more DDR4 when DDR5 gets out

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10:23 Apr-28-2021

Early DDR5 is gonna have really bad latency.

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11:27 Apr-28-2021

I recommend switching back to the very first SDRAM for CL 2 or DDR SDRAM for C L2-3 then, because that's all that matters, right? :)


(the numbers are tied to the frequency - the higher the frequency - the higher CL you get, but the overall performance is still better)

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12:56 Apr-28-2021

correct, https://notkyon.moe/ram-latency.htm here you can calculate the real latency you get when combinig frequency with CL

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13:43 Apr-28-2021

It would be good to know whether it takes the base frequency or the double-data frequency (for a DDR4 3600MHz the base would be 1800MHz) - it doesn't really say...

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14:38 Apr-28-2021

i assume it takes the double data frequency, usually when ram says 3200mhz it's the ddr, i've nerver seen any vendor refer to 3200mhz by writing 1600mhz

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14:59 Apr-28-2021

Yeah, but CPU-Z does show the base data rate, which is what prompted my question

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23:44 Apr-28-2021

Yeah, you always need to take frequency with timings, because frequency determines how fast cycles are so needless to say, fast ram with higher CL can be just as fast as slower with low CL.


As for calculator, it takes double rate, so 3200Mhz, not 1600Mhz. I know because I know 3200Mhz at CL 16 is 10ns. Just saying, in case anyone hasn't figure it out already.

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23:49 Apr-28-2021

P.S. All rounded to 2 digits..
4800Mhz at CL40 is 16,67ns
5600Mhz at CL46 is 16,43ns
6400Mgz at CL52 is 16,25ns
For comparison:
2133Mhz at CL16 is 15,002ns
Added one extra digit, since it is not exactly 15. At CL18 2133Mhz, I guess you get to DDR5 latency, 16,88ns. Auch.

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05:58 Apr-29-2021

So like I was saying


4800MHz at CL40? Nah


Crucial Ballistix MAX DDR4 memory is at 5100MHz at CL19. I don't know about you, but this would still be a better option.


Even with the changes being made for DDR5, the latency isn't ideal for early adopting. Plus, it won't be cheap either. I would like to be wrong and say the latency is less of a factor for it. Honestly that would be really nice. But idk

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13:38 Apr-29-2021

I'd be curious to see if this extra latency is negated when taking into consideration the fact that DDR5 will feature two channels per DIMM - this is intended to reduce access latency and improve throughput. So if you compare the numbers - yes, DDR5 seems slower, but I very much doubt the calculators available are made with DDR5 in mind to begin with, which would give you a bad impression. I'd wait and see, before making the judgment that DDR5 is slow and looking silly if it turns out to be the other way around.

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00:12 Apr-30-2021

Yeah, you're right. I'm interested in the whole two channels per DIMM thing.

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12:19 Apr-30-2021

Well I wonder what would be the point in even producing a slower memory

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13:29 Apr-30-2021

That's what I'm thinking. Surely the enterprise and datacenter customers (I mention them because they're the first market for these things) want FASTER, not slower, lol.

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05:34 Apr-28-2021

Is this true? Those timings are massive. Latency will be an issue here.

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11:22 Apr-28-2021

That's what I thought at first glance, but when we went from DDR3 to DDR4 - there was a similar "doubling" in latency as well - going from CAS 7-9 to CAS 15-17. These numbers are tied to the clock frequency, which is why they will now be higher than DDR4 again.


For reference, the original SDRAM and DDR-SDRAM had CL 2-3 range, so if you think CL matters that much - you might wanna switch back to the ancient standards xD

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18:33 Apr-28-2021

maybe, but this is not doubling, this is more like tripling also higher frequencies counters it, but these ddr5 frequencies in the table doesnt look that much higher. there is calculation for absolute latency and that shows horrible results

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18:37 Apr-28-2021

They're not horrible, but they are not the best, sure. Though I'm curious as to what the real world implications of that are, especially considering the larger datasets that the new capacities will enable. I'm sure these timings will be tightened, clocks will go up eventually - basically it's a wait-and-see kind of a thing again.
What I'd also like to see is consumer-grade CPUs not being stripped away of quad-channel support, because it seems to help quite a bit with slower RAM modules.

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20:16 Apr-28-2021

Not horrible? 3600/CL16 memory has 8,88 nanoseconds latency, 4800/CL40 is 16,66 that is basicaly double. For 8,88 latency these CL40 ramsticks would need frequency at least 9000.

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20:22 Apr-28-2021

If we compare it with some older ones, for example DDR3 2400/CL9 you get 7.5 nanoseconds or DDR2 1066/CL4 was too 7,5 nanoseconds. But these were the best timings you could get you can get that on DDR4 too. Jump to 15ns is just too much

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20:39 Apr-28-2021

Yes, and this means exactly what in terms of real-world use? From what I'm reading, DDR5 will also now have two channels per DIMM (instead of one), more throughput (up to double) and (ultimately) double the frequency. I have a feeling that CL rating is not going to tell the same story as it does with DDR-DDR4. It's not like the engineers would be designing and enterprise clients requesting a slower DDR spec, but be my guest and say if you don't think so.

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04:00 Apr-28-2021

I believe that many people will buy a new pc when the new motherboard socket and DDR5 becomes available.

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23:15 Apr-27-2021

Be ready to wait another year for prices to stabilize and with manufacturers slowly switching to DDR5 there might be a brief shortage of DDR4.

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22:39 Apr-27-2021

i guess its time to save up money 2022-2023 for new PC

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19:53 Apr-27-2021

So one more opportunity for the scalpers to scavenge off pf people's misery. And of course better mining performance for the miners. Rejoice everybody!


As I have gotten older I realize that I just don't give a fck about what I say anymore and its wonderful!

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18:16 May-04-2021

Why better perf for miners? We mine on GPUs, not CPUs or RAM lol. Not giving an F for "offense" reasons is one thing, but another is to talk nonsense altogether xD

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19:52 Apr-27-2021

Dual Channel DDR5 at 6400Mhz will be amazing for iGPUs and if we get a tri or quad channel it will be even more amazing.

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11:29 Apr-28-2021

More CPUs should support quad-channel!

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07:38 Apr-29-2021

Agreed, but the benefits are for only a few specific tasks, while the cost increase is quite big for both CPU and motherboard and ram really it's going to kill the competitive edge, so unless both AMD and Intel switch to quad channel at the same time or quad channel becomes a necessity for common tasks we won't get it

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07:39 Apr-29-2021

I can still dream though :D

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13:42 Apr-29-2021

The cost increase is, as always, mostly due to economies of scale. If it were standard, like dual-channel - it would not cost that much more to implement. Plus even Linus tested quad-channel setups and it helps getting better in-game fps, as a matter of fact. Not a lot, since DDR4 is already plenty fast in whatever config, but it shows up on the charts. If some people are anal about buying 3600+ memory for those extra 2fps - why not quad channel then? Same thing...

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12:57 Apr-30-2021

Well not only that, CPUs would need a quad channel controller, that's a bigger die size there which increases cost of the CPU. I'm not sure what improved or extra components you'd need on the motherboard itself for quad channel, probably better VCC controllers for the memory.

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14:01 Apr-30-2021

So that's what, a few cents in raw material at the fab stage? It wouldn't cost an arm and a leg to implement and make standard.

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19:35 Apr-27-2021

Nice, so when the time comes to upgrade my pc, hopefully the DDR5 prices will be affordable (by the time the gpu/cpu hardware has settled down to hopefully old prices).

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17:26 Apr-27-2021

I got 2x8GB of DDR4 3200Mhz CL16 RAM. Works perfectly fine for me and I am not looking to jump on DDR5 early. Especially for gaming, there is usually no benefit for going to new DDR early, it can even have opposite effect, same as it was with DDR3 to 4. It will improve over time, as it did with DDR4. But gaming wise, you are at least mostly fine even with DDR3. But eventually I will upgrade.

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17:28 Apr-27-2021

Also it will all depend on when new CPUs will even come with DDR5 option and whether everything will support it or if it will be more of high end option. Plus price of DDR5. Like it will really depend. But as things get optimized for DDR5, yields better, prices go lower, it gets adoption through whole lineup,... I will upgrade to it. Provided availability of other parts improves.

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20:22 Apr-27-2021

It does have the opposite effect at first. The timings are horrible! Like you, I have 2x8GB DDR4 3200Mhz CL16 and have zero motivation going to DDR5 anytime soon...

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11:30 Apr-28-2021

Timings are not everything. If you think they are - why not switch back to SDRAM or even bump up to DDR-SDRAM to get CL2 ? xDD

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23:52 Apr-28-2021

Yes, they aren't everything, though at certain point it starts to depend. Gaming for example tends to more respond to lower timings, which you do get with faster RAM, since even if you have extra cycles, they are shorter. But for gaming you can take slower DDR4 with lower timings or just go for faster DDR4 and ore relaxed timings. Hence why DDR3 worked so well so far for gaming.

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13:44 Apr-29-2021

I suppose it also depends on how much data we're accessing and how often. I'd be curious to see if there's a perceivable drop in DDR3 viability for new large games, where it wouldn't have been a problem with older, smaller titles of the day.

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22:54 Apr-29-2021

By now, I am pretty sure there would be difference, though I also would be curious to see how much. But it would be hard to test, since we would need chip that supports both, but wouldn't get bottlenecked somewhere else. Can't remember which was last generation that supported both.

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17:06 Apr-27-2021

I still have ddr3 so it will be a good upgrade for me.

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18:05 Apr-27-2021

I was holding to upgrade for DDR5 but with the current shortage... oh well

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22:40 Apr-27-2021

ddr3 gaming club

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23:02 Apr-27-2021

well..... i wanted to hop from ddr3 to ddr5 but i guess i will settle on getting DDR4 3600 MHz CL16 + i5-11400f (released for 15$ more than the 10400f here so worth it) & B560m

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08:31 Apr-28-2021

well right now my needs (gaming and from university) are fine with this PC, but i guess once DDR5 is out i will start looking for a massive upg. It all depends on the prices for GPU's tho.

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16:52 Apr-27-2021

Well, as a fairly early adopter of DDR4 I ended up with slow memory, so this time it's probably gonna be worth waiting a bit before upgrading to a new platform. If I can stretch my 5960X for another year or two till AMD come out with a decent new CPU - that's gonna be my cue (unless intel manage to leapfrog back to the top)

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17:50 Apr-27-2021

Intel really did a good job with the 5960x, i was wondering if it is a good idea to wait next year to upgrade to an r7 6800x and the new DDR5 Ram, because i feel my r7 2700 will not be able to fully utilize an rtx 3080/3080ti

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15:02 Apr-28-2021

The Quad-channel memory config, good overclocking and a large PCIe lane count really saved the 5960X in the long term, IMO, which is why I'm not in a big hurry to replace it just yet, even though I'm driving a 3090 on it.
As for "fully utilizing" the GPU - that is a tricky subject. If I were a 1080p/1440p gamer - sure, my CPU isn't the fastest, but at 4K, 5K and 8K - the resolutions I typically play at (for extra detail and AA, despite my 1440p screen) - the CPU doesn't really struggle. So it all depends on how you're gonna use the GPU upgrade :)

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16:44 Apr-27-2021

2022 seems to be the year to build a pc. DDR5, PCI-E 5.0, AM5 and a generation of GPUs you can buy.

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18:17 Apr-27-2021

why do you think that the minner craze would stop by then?

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19:37 Apr-27-2021

Only if the manufacturers will make specific gaming cards. Imagine paying 50 euro less for a "gaming" edition, which is basically the same card, but with hardware locks hash rates to something low, making it useless for mining operations.

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