Call of Duty Warzone and Vanguard are getting kernel-level anti-cheat soon

Written by Chad Norton on Thu, Oct 14, 2021 10:59 AM
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For a long time the Call of Duty series has been plagued with cheaters, especially in Warzone due to its free-to-play model. Activision has so far been teasing a new anti-cheat system that will be coming into effect soon, and just recently officially revealed Ricochet: the kernel-live anti-cheat system for Warzone andVanguard.

The Ricochet Anti-Cheat initiative is a multi-faceted approach to combat cheating,” Activision said in the official post. “Featuring new server-side tools which monitor analytics to identify cheating, enhanced investigation processes to stamp out cheaters, updates to strengthen account security, and more.

In addition to server enhancements coming with Ricochet Anti-Cheat is the launch of a new PC kernel-level driver, developed internally for the Call of Duty franchise, and launching first for Call of Duty: Warzone. This driver will assist in the identification of cheaters, reinforcing and strengthening the overall server security.

Essentially, the new system should help to prevent cheaters in games like Call of Duty Warzone and Call of Duty Vanguard. It will launch first for Warzone when the new Pacific map/update is released, and then shortly after for Vanguard. If we go by the same thing that happened last year with Black Ops Cold War, we’re looking at around 2 months from now until the technology is officially implemented in Warzone.

Of course, kernel-level drivers are a bit controversial in the PC gaming space, but they do certainly work better than other types of anti-cheat. Valorant was heavily criticized at launch for having a kernel-level driver that would always stay on no matter what you were doing. Conversely, Activision confirmed Ricochet will only run when Warzone or Vanguard is running, and when you quit the game Ricochet will also be turned off.

That may not fully convince some more security-minded PC gamers, but Call of Duty is one of the biggest franchises in the world and it seems that players are so fed up with cheaters online that most are backing the new software. Valorant has managed to come out the other side after significant backlash, so Call of Duty probably can too.

Ricochet will be exclusive to PC players, as most easily obtained cheats like wallhacking and aimbot are more readily available on PC. But console players who have crossplay enabled will also stand to benefit from it as well. It’s not a single one-size-fits-all solution for cheating, but it's definitely better than whatever system they have now.

There is no single solution or policy to cheating. The Ricochet Anti-Cheat team’s commitment is the relentless pursuit of fair play, which is fought against the sophisticated issue of cheating. We are dedicated and determined to evolve the Ricochet Anti-Cheat System, fighting for the community against those that aim to spoil their gaming experience.

What do you think? Are you still playing Warzone? Are you excited for Vanguard? How do you feel about the new kernel-level anti-cheat? Has that turned you off from playing? Would you feel safe downloading it? Let us know your thoughts!

Are you okay with a kernel level anti cheat for Warzone and Vanguard?

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06:51 Oct-15-2021

meh prob wont work but anything to rid the world of cheaters, in life and games.

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06:08 Oct-15-2021

I had not planned to ever play either of these games before and this update has guaranteed that'll never happen.

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19:42 Oct-14-2021

I am sure kernel-level access will fiix everything just like it did for Valorant and now Valorant players live in an ideal world where pigs fly. Oh wait, that must be the cheat making the pig fly.


TLDR: FCK this and CoD especially Warzone.

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19:43 Oct-14-2021

Who the FCK voted Yes in the polls?

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17:38 Oct-14-2021

In my opinion, kernel access is way too far and gives them way too much power. So no, I will just pass on playing those games. In the end, cheaters will be there regardless of how much access that protection takes and since it is kernel level, it only risks my system stability, opens it up to potential attack, if they got security flaws, not to mention full access you can do nothing about, since it is running on higher privilege than you. Though I doubt we will see any noteworthy boycotts, so those protections are likely here to stay.

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12:06 Oct-14-2021

The thing to always worry about is "kernel-level" stuff. Always exciting when stupid game protection gets more system access than anything else on it, especially when said game protection is obviously made by flawed 3rd party humans...

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11:38 Oct-14-2021

Just like valve's AI aiti-cheat thingy that I forgot the name of, which did jack all, except for the most obvious cheaters in CS:GO.

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