News + Features
Microsoft’s Windows version 1909 update, codenamed ‘H219’, is set to begin rolling out this week. It’s a big one, and it happens to include a pretty exciting new feature which could aid gaming performance. 
Microsoft has announced it’s adding in one of its most requested features for Windows 10. Well, actually, it’s just adding something back in it had already taken out, and calling it a new ‘improvement’. 
There’s an optional new update for Windows 10 which it looks as if you should avoid at all costs. The KB4512941 update was released to the public after just a single day of testing in the Release Preview Ring, yet users have now discovered it causes very high CPU usage issues which will affect your PC performance.
Microsoft has just pushed out the Windows 10 20H1 Build 18950 for Windows Insiders zooming along in the Fast Ring. Most of what it includes is pretty boring, to be honest, but there is one bit of significant interest - this build lays the groundwork for allowing reinstalls of Windows 10 through the cloud rather than fiddling around with a local install.
This is an interesting one. Nvidia felt that there was a gap in the market for an FPS recorder, that worked outside of their graphics card software, Nvidia GeForce Experience. As the Nvidia GeForce Experience already comes with a turn on and off FPS counter for your games, but only works with Nvidia cards. And so for that part we would have to agree, there is a need for an independent FPS recorder. As it would be nice to have one reliable, open-source choice for recording in game benchmarks that everyone could gravitate towards as a standard. It seems Nvidia's new FrameView is a step towards achieving this, although it doesnt appear to be open source.
Microsoft has bunged in a surprise addition with Windows 10 version 1903, adding an extra toggle to the Windows graphics settings to enable OS-wide Variable Refresh Rate (VRR) support.
You can breathe a sigh of relief - Microsoft has announced it is abandoning Windows 10’s forced updates. Every six months or so, Microsoft pushes out a major new update for Windows 10 users, with the infamous October update last year causing widespread issues. These updates download automatically and then install upon reboot.
UPDATE: Microsoft has admitted the latest Windows 10 update that included the Retpoline CPU performance enhancement could have a negative impact on gaming performance.
Microsoft has run into a rather embarrassing hiccup lately that means Windows Update fails to properly check there’s enough space on local storage for a Windows 10 patch before it downloads and attempts to install it. This can lead to a potential scenario where Windows 10 fails to reboot properly due to a failed partial update attempt.
UPDATE: Right, we're back on this merry-go-round again. Microsoft has officially re-released the Windows 10 October update, version 1809. Let's hope it's fifth time lucky.
Microsoft has finally begun rolling out the Windows 10 October 2018 update. Operating system updates aren’t usually very exciting, even at the best of the times, but this one has managed to get our pulses racing. The Windows 10 October update finally patches in DirectX Raytracing support, opening up the full capabilities of the newly launched GeForce RTX 20 Series graphics cards.

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